ROBERT WILLIAMS BUCHANAN (1841 - 1901)

Home
Biography
Bibliography

Poetry
Plays
Fiction

Essays
Reviews
Letters

The Fleshly School Controversy
Buchanan and the Press
Buchanan and the Law

The Critical Response
Harriett Jay
Miscellanea

Links
Site Diary
Site Search

A ROBERT BUCHANAN FILMOGRAPHY - continued

 

A MAN’S SHADOW (1920)
Written and directed by
Sidney Morgan
Produced by Frank E. Spring for Progress
Cast:
Langhorn Burton Peter Beresford/Julian Grey
Violet Graham Vivian Beresford
Gladys Mason Yolande Hampton
Arthur Lennard Robert Hampden
J. Denton-Thompson Williams
Sidney Paxton Billings
Babs Ronald Helen Beresford
Warris Linden Simon Oppenheim
Format: 35mm, 1,676m/5,447 ft, six reels. Filmed at Shoreham, near Brighton.

manshadowfilmpic02

[From the Daily Mail (11 December, 1920 - p.1).]

manshadfilmhastings

[From the Hastings & St. Leonards Observer (31 December, 1921 - p.5).]

 

Western Morning News (7 January, 1922 - p.7)

     SAVOY PICTURE HOUSE.—Two interesting items in the programme commencing on Monday are “A Man’s Shadow,” featuring Langhorne Burton, and “Love’s Pay Day,” in which Rosemary Thebe takes the leading part. The former is from Sir Herbert Tree’s Haymarket success by Robert Buchanan, while the other is an absorbing story of a young fishing girl who, in consequence of love of gaiety, was the means of the downfall of her lover. On Thursday the chief exhibit will be the All-British film entitled “Nothing Else Matters,” featuring Hugh E. Wright, Moyna Maggill, and Betty Balfour. This is a great human story, interwoven with which is a touching love plot. Next comes “The Sea Wolf,” one of Jack London’s enthralling stories, and an excellent comedy will complete the programme.

manshadfilmnottingham

[From the Grantham Journal (14 January, 1922 - p.7).]

 

The Burnley News (18 February, 1922 - p.15)

LANGHORNE BURTON’S DUAL ROLE.

     The work of Langhorne Burton is so well known to patrons of the Alhambra that the announcement of his appearance in “A Man’s Shadow” on Thursday, Friday and Saturday next will meet with general approval. Fresh from Butcher’s Service, this film gives Langhorne Burton a great opportunity of displaying his ability in as much as he figures in a dual role. From the beginning to end events move rapidly, and as they are interpreted by a strong cast the picture leaves nothing to be desired. Supporting Langhorne Burton are Violet Graham, Arthur Lennard, Gladys Mason, J. Warris Linden, Babs Ronald, T. Denton Thompson, and Sydney Paxton.

manshadowfilmad02

[From the Exeter and Plymouth Gazette (17 July, 1922 - p.2).]

_____

 

THE LIGHTS OF HOME (1920)
Directed by Fred Paul
Script by Charles Barnett and J. Bertram Brown
Produced by Screen Plays (The BFI lists the production company as the Master Film Company.)
Cast:
George Foley Dave Purvis
Nora Hayden Tress Purvis
Jack Raymond Mark
Moya Nugent Sybil Garfield
John Stuart Philip Compton
Cecil Morton York Squire Garfield
Frank Tennant Arthur Tredgold

 

The Times (20 December, 1920 - p.8)

“THE LIGHTS OF HOME”

     The Lights of Home, the new film based on the play by Mr. George R. Sims and Mr. Robert Buchanan, is full of excitements, with one notably fine piece of acting by Mr. George Foley as an old Cornish fisherman, whose daughter has been betrayed by an artist “from London.” The artist then tries to marry the niece of the squire, but is duly frustrated in his schemes and is finally kicked out of the village. But to us the method of production of the film is more interesting than the film itself. To a large extent “studio work” has been done away with. There are very few interior scenes at all, and most of those that there are are laid in humble cottages. The film was taken in the neighbourhood of Fowey, the players being taken to their destination by charabanc. An electrical installation was carried and driven from the charabanc so that when it was not in use for touring purposes it became a generator of power. When a cottage scene was required wires were run into the actual cottage and the scene enacted therein, thus saving the heavy expense of erecting scenes in the studio and ensuring an absolute fidelity to Cornish conditions that could not be obtained by any other means. The results were eminently successful, but all through the film the lighting is one of the strongest points. There are some beautiful sea and sky effects which add considerably to the value of the picture. The weakest point is the acting, apart from that of Mr. George Foley. Some of the efforts in this direction are decidedly amateurish.

lightshomesimshull03

[From The Hull Daily Mail (16 February, 1922 - p.4).]

 

Hastings and St Leonards Observer (25 March, 1922 - p.5)

“THE LIGHTS OF HOME” AT THE PUBLIC HALL.

     The fare at the Public Hall Cinema, near the Memorial, is always attractive and the programme to-day (Saturday) includes “The Double Event,” a very pleasing light comedy drama adapted by Kenelm Foss and featuring Lionelle Howard, Mary Odette, Louie Freear and Tom Coventry; “Miracles of the Jungle,” and Gaumont Graphic.
     On Monday, Tuesday and Wednesday the programme will include George Foley in “The Lights of Home,” a fine film adapted from the popular drama by George R. Sims and Robert Buchanan. The story concerns Tress, the motherless daughter of old Dave Purvis, a Cornish fisherman, who falls a victim to the romantic glamour of Arthur Tredgold, an artist who is on holiday in Cornwall. Later Tredgold returns to London, promising to come back soon and marry Tress, but he does not and Tress becomes the subject of scandal amongst the villagers. The story continues with great interest. The cast includes George Foley, Jack Raymond, Frank Tennant and Nora Hayden. In support will be “The Tempest” (Robertson-Cole interest); Gaumont Graphic; and “Home, Sweet Home” (Interest).

_____

 

THE ENGLISH ROSE (1920)
Directed by
Fred Paul
Script by
Paul Rooff
Produced by John Robyns for British Standard
Cast:
Fred Paul Father Michael
Humberston Wright Captain MacDonnell
Sydney Folker Harry O'Malley
Mary Morton
Jock Raymond
Amy Brandon Thomas
George Turner
Clifford Desborough

engrosefilmad02

[From the Dover Express (15 August, 1924 - p.6).]

_____

 

LOVE IN AN ATTIC (1923) (Short)
(based on the poem, The Little Milliner)
Directed by Edwin Greenwood
Script by Eliot Stannard
Produced by Edward Godal for British & Colonial Kinematograph Company
Cast:
Nina Vanna The Milliner
Russell Thorndike The Producer
Walter Tennyson The Dramatist
Format: 35mm, 547.45 m, two reels.

loveinatticfilm02

[From The Hull Daily Mail (12 February, 1924 - p.2).]

_____

 

LA DONNA E L’UOMO (1923)
(based on the novel, Woman and the Man)
Written and directed by Amleto Palermi
Cinematographer: Giovanni Grimaldi
Produced by Rinascimento Film (Italy)
Cast:
Pina Menichelli Gillian
Milton Rosmer Philip O’Mara
Livio Pavanelli
Sir George
Marcella Sabbatini Little Dora
Alfredo Bertone
Format: 35 mm Film. Runtime: 65 min.

donnauomo
ladonnaeluomo

BFI synopsis: “Gillian is married to Philip O'Mara, who leaves her and their baby, and goes to Australia. When she meets a rich baron who wishes to marry her, Philip starts persecuting her with letters and requests for money. Gillian almost goes mad and at the last minute Philip is killed, freeing her.”

 

The Times (8 May, 1922 - p.5)

“The newest move in film production has taken the form of a combination of French, Italian, and English producers, who are working on pictures, parts of which are being produced in the three countries. The Film La Grande of Paris has recently completed a film of Oscar Wilde’s story of “Lord Arthur Savile’s Crime,” the principal features of which are scenes taken in various parts of London. The Renaissance Film Company of Rome are now in London making preparations for filming Mr. Robert Buchanan’s “Woman and the Man,” which is to be followed by Sir H. Rider Haggard’s “Jane Haste.” Signor Amato, who is directing the production, is returning to Italy in a few days to take the interior scenes. The object of both French and Italian producers is to make pictures that will unify the tastes and interests of the three nations, and to combine in their productions the best that is in all three in a European atmosphere, as opposed to that of America.”

A restored version of La Donna e l’uomo was shown at the La Rochelle International Film Festival in 1996.

donnaposter02

[Poster for the Cine-Teatro Montagnetta - April, 1924.]

womanfilmadlincoln

[From the Lincolnshire Echo (22 October, 1925 - p.1).]

 

The Derby Daily Telegraph (24 October, 1925 - p.3)

THE PICTURE HOUSE.

     Attractive programmes have been arranged for the Picture House for the forthcoming week. On Monday, Tuesday, and Wednesday the super-production, “The Stardust Trail,” will be exhibited for the first time, the film featuring Shirley Mason. This is the story of a theatrical star who weds a member of the profession, for whom a rival lays in wait. Fascinating and intimate views of life behind the scenes and the footlights form a feature in this production. Bryant Washburn plays opposite Shirley Mason, the remainder of a talented cast including Richard Tucker, Thomas Mills, and Shannon Day. For the second portion of the week Milton Rosmer and Pina Menichelli will appear in the powerful Robert Buchanan story, “Woman and the Man.” This is a tale of a hasty marriage, full of dramatic passages and pathetic human touches. It provides capital screen fare, and has the advantage of being played by such polished artists as Milton Rosmer and Pina Menichelli. Each programme will contain the usual series of up-to-date comedies and items of interest, including in the first portion of the week the first episode of the new serial, “The Mysterious Pearl,” featuring Ben Wilson and Neva Gerber.

_____

 

Four film versions were also made of When Knights Were Bold. This play, first produced in 1906, and credited solely to ‘Charles Marlowe’ (Harriett Jay’s pseudonym), was originally a Buchanan and Jay collaboration from 1896 entitled, Good Old Times. Since Buchanan’s name was never attached to the play or the films I have not included the latter in this filmography but full details are included in the section below:

When Knights Were Bold - The Films

_____

 

Back to Bibliography

 

Home
Biography
Bibliography

 

Poetry
Plays
Fiction

 

Essays
Reviews
Letters

 

The Fleshly School Controversy
Buchanan and the Press
Buchanan and the Law

 

The Critical Response
Harriett Jay
Miscellanea

 

Links
Site Diary
Site Search